Hindu Muslim Unity: How Indus River cultures shaped Sufism

Bulleh Shah, Sufi poet and philosopher
Bulleh Shah, Sufi poet and philosopher

The Indus is one of the oldest and longest rivers in Asia. Though it originated in the Tibetan Plateau in China, much of it flows across Pakistan. Various religions and cultures have thrived here: Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Islam. Each of these religions were indigenised.

Historically, the strand of Sufism which emerged on the banks of Indus (especially in Punjab and all the way across Sindh), consciously eschewed religious orthodoxy and, at times, even rebelled against it.

The poetry and music that emerged from Sufi circles along the river is therefore largely a result of the theological, political and social tensions between Sufis and the orthodox ulema and clerics.

Read more: Communal Harmony

Hindu Muslim Unity: Kicking off New Year with bhajans and qawwalis

KARACHI: A night full of bhajans, sufi songs and qawwalis is what the Karachi-based Hindu NGO Pakistan Hindu Seva Welfare Trust (PHSWT) has planned for the New Year eve while carrying forward the message of peace, promoting interfaith harmony and dialogue for a peaceful coexistence.

Such functions in Pakistan would help create awareness about Hindu community and provided cooperative, constructive and positive interaction between different communities, he said. “That’s what we aim through our bhajan and qawwali night on New Year.”

Read more: Communal Harmony

Hindu Muslim Unity: Muslims organize Hindu yatra for over 100 years

Jagannath Temple, Puri
Jagannath Temple, Puri

ORISSA: Close on the heels of the show of communal amity by inhabitants of Mohalla village in Kendrapara district on Rath Yatra day, yet another example of religious harmony was witnessed at Remada village in Orissa’s Jharsuguda district on Friday. The village, having a population of about 1,000, was the scene of camaraderie among local tribals and Muslims, who have joined hands to organise Rath Yatra every year for nearly 100 years now. In fact, the village headman (locally known as gountia), Mohammed Zamiullah, takes upon himself the task of organising the festival.

Hindus also reciprocated the feelings of the minority community in ample measure by joining their festivals. Mohammed Khalil and Maulana Mustquim Khan, gountias of the village have also written many plays and prayers based on Hindu lore, Hassan said.

Read more: Communal Harmony
Related story: Gujarati Muslims participate in Rath Yatra