Hindu Muslim Unity: Krishna’s birthday celebrated at Narhar Dargah

Muslim family carries son playing Hindu avatar Krishna
Muslim family carries son playing Hindu avatar Krishna

JAIPUR:  Not many people know but Narhar Dargah, also known as Sharif Hazrat Hajib Shakarbar Dargah has been celebrating Janmashtami for the past 300-400 years.

“Its very hard to say the exact time and reason from when this festival is celebrated in the dargah but this marks an important event for national and communal unity. Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs stay together and organiZe the event.” says dargah secretary Usman Ali Pathan.

“Thousands of Hindus come here and offer coconuts and flowers to the shrine and stay together. The idea behind organiZing this festival is to increase the love and unity among different religions in the country,” added Pathan. Devotees visiting the Dargah are surprised by such an event and the way it is smoothly organised and run from almost 400 years.

Read more: Communal Harmony

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Hindu Muslim Unity: celebrating Teej and Ramadan together

iftar/prasad

JAIPUR: The festivals of Teej and the first of the Ramzan coincided with each other after a gap of thirty years and saw people from the Hindu and Muslim communities celebrating the festivals with much love and peace in Jaipur. In Jaipur the festivals of Teej and the first day of Ramzan coincided after three decades. At many places Muslims showered rose and petals on Teej procession when it passed through Muslim-majority areas. Reciprocating in the same spirit, many Hindus chose to enjoy the special sweet dishes ‘kheer’, ‘halwa-parantha’ and ‘malai’ with bread during Iftaar.

Read more: Communal Harmony

Hindu Muslim Unity: Muslims dance in garba

JAIPUR: Displaying centuries old ethos of communal harmony through fun and frolic, a group of 15 people – 12 Muslims and 3 Hindus – all hailing from the Walled City are behind the city’s most enchanting Garba nights

Shakeel Khan, one of the organizers recounted, “In my childhood, I actively participated in organizing garbas in my locality. Here I am using all my expertise learnt from organizing the garbas from Mohallas to narrow streets. To maintain the sanctity, they have asked a Brahmin to perform the puja.”

Shakeel believes that taking part in garba  is part of the city’s shared culture. “Still in Walled city areas which has a mixed population you cannot differentiate between Hindus and Muslims even after playing garba for the whole night,” Shakeel added. His co-partner, Shashi Soni, came up with the idea of taking it to a different level by organising it at a premier location.

Read more: Communal Harmony